Topic: Equity and social justice



Equality of Opportunity, Equality of Means: An Argument for Low Tuition and the Student Strike

By Daniel Weinstock

Read Jacob T. Levy’s take on this issue here. Political philosophers have taken in recent years to distinguishing between “ideal theory” and […]

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The Quiet Campus: The Anatomy of Dissent at Canadian Universities

By Ken Coates

The remarkable—a word that can be read in many different ways—2012 student protests in Quebec have stirred memories of the activist campuses […]

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Not Another Brick in the Wall: Capitalism and Student Protests in Chile

By Andrés Bernasconi

A few days ago, I visited a high school in a poor urban area in Western Santiago and met with the junior […]

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“Ensemble, bloquons la hausse”: The Rationale Behind the Slogan

By Martin Robert

In the spring of 2012 hundreds of thousands of Quebec students and their allies took to the streets to protest the government’s proposed tuition fee increase. Martin Robert makes the case against the tuition increase and proposes an alternative model in which tuition would be free in Quebec.

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Lost in Translation after Graduation?

By Pamela Cushing, Ph.D. & Kimberly Ruiter, B.A., King’s University College at Western University

What students do after leaving the academy can be impressive, surprising, and, as one department found out, useful for universities interested in improving the student experience.

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proof

False allegations of sexual harassment: Misunderstandings and realities

By Catherine Burr

Since sexual harassment can be in the eye of the beholder, only evidence that meets civil standards of proof, argues a university complaints investigator, can fairly decide what happened.

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"Welcome" in various languages

Broadening accessibility to postsecondary education in Canada

By Glen A. Jones

Increasing access to postsecondary education is a challenging problem with no easy solutions. But given Canada’s demographics and the rapidly changing nature of our economy, it’s a problem we cannot ignore. We can’t afford to be satisfied with current participation rates while key components of our population are ill-equipped to engage with the emerging social and economic realities of the twenty-first century.

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