Topic: Participation and enrolment


The Indigenous diversity gap

By Malinda S. Smith and Nancy Bray

Where are the Indigenous Peoples in Canadian universities? Canadian postsecondary institutions have pursued equity, diversity, and inclusion policies and programs since the […]

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Supporting mature female students enrolling in university STEM programs

Mature women students face additional barriers when enrolling in STEM programs. Shutterstock Women face many barriers when it comes to post-secondary education, […]

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Mentors play critical role in quality of university and college experience, new poll suggests

In order to have a rewarding college experience, students should build a constellation of mentors. This constellation should be a diverse set of faculty, staff and peers who will get students out of their comfort zones and challenge them to learn more – and more deeply – than they thought they could. Students should begin to build this network during their first year of college.

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Dangerous stereotypes stalk black university and college athletes

If you go strictly by the official account, heatstroke was the cause of death for University of Maryland football player Jordan McNair. McNair died earlier this year following a grueling practice in which training staff failed to properly diagnose and treat his condition. But there’s another culprit – or at least a contributing factor – that should not be overlooked.

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For universities, making the case for diversity is part of making amends for racist past

The Trump administration recently announced plans to scrap Obama-era guidelines that encouraged universities to consider race as a factor to promote diversity on campus, claiming the guidelines “advocate policy preferences and positions beyond the requirements of the Constitution.” Some university leaders immediately went on the defense.

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How playful design is transforming university education

A group of 25 interns sit at Baycrest Health Sciences, a research centre for aging in Canada, their eyes glued to their smart phones. They are playing SOS — an award-winning game that simulates real-world gerontology practice — where they compete with other students to earn virtual currency. Across town, a group of professors sit around a table at George Brown College, designing a role-playing game with a virtual hospital called The Grid, based on a Matrix-like theme of saving the world from ignorance, for an accredited program in health sciences. Yet another team of game programmers are hard at work at Humber College, building a virtual reality experience of a subway car after a bomb incident. Players wear goggles, moving from person to person, saving some and tagging others for care later on.

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Why there are so few Indigenous graduates at convocation

Convocation can be a very emotional occasion. Each year, it seems, the commentariat is whipped up into near hysterics over some honorary […]

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Mental illness on campus really is ‘a thing’

Unlike his former classmates, Alex isn’t writing final exams right now, or searching for a summer job, or choosing electives for next […]

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Expanding graduate programs and renewing the professoriate: What’s the connection?

By Ian D. Clark, David Trick and Richard Van Loon

Does Ontario need to expand its master’s and doctoral programs in order to supply the professors who will teach these additional students? Ian Clark, David Trick and Richard Van Loon argue that in all fields of graduate study, the government should take into account the best available evidence to ensure that the number of graduate spaces is sufficient to meet the needs of the workforce, but not higher.

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