Winter 2017

Measuring up?

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In This Issue

Editorial Matters: Alluring figures

By Ben Lewis

There is an appealing simplicity in numbers. A number’s value is never ambiguous, even if its meaning can be. Numbers are specific […]

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Unintended consequences: The use of metrics in higher education

By Gavin Moodie

Metrics are used throughout Ontario’s postsecondary education system—for determining university funding, judging institutional performance, and gauging student perceptions. But metrics are not […]

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Is there a metric to evaluate tenure?

By Tim Sibbald and Victoria Handford

How much can data meaningfully inform decisions about tenure? If data only tell part of the story, perhaps faculty should be evaluated […]

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The abuses and perverse effects of quantitative evaluation in the academy

By Yves Gingras

The world of academic research is scored according to so-called “objective” measures, with an emphasis on publications and citations. But the very […]

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Dérives et effets pervers de l’évaluation quantitative de la recherche

By Yves Gingras

Les professeurs et les chercheurs universitaires sont de plus en plus évalués à l’aide de mesures dites « objectives », qui mettent […]

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Collecting data from students with students

By Ruth Childs

Gathering data on university students can provide important information about how they interact with the postsecondary education system, but it is also […]

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Waking up to the reality of Canadian higher education

By Claire Polster and Sarah Amsler

Higher-education systems in Canada and the United Kingdom share much in common, but there are important differences that faculty on both sides […]

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Understanding the United Kingdom’s Teaching Excellence Framework and its implications

By Rob Copeland

The UK’s new metrics-based teaching evaluation framework is methodologically and politically flawed. What will this mean for the country’s universities and faculty? […]

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